VideUM

Copyright

 

 

Copyright and image right

On this page you can learn about the basics of video and copyright. Videos are protected by copyright, just as texts are. Dutch copyright is a creator’s right that protects any work created by an author. Anyone taking a photo, writing a letter, a drawing or making a video with a camera or smartphone, is considered the creator; the work is automatically protected by copyright. So anyone who wants to copy or distribute the work, needs the creator’s permission. In this context, a license refers to permission. A license or permission can be a long contract or very short statement by the copyright owner granting someone permission to use the material, and under what circumstances. 

When in doubt about copyright, please contact one of our specialists at the UM library the copyright specialists at the UM library Copyright Information Point

Watch this video and learn about the basics of video in education and copyright.

Dutch organisations that represent the creators and license holders.
Contact the respective organisation if you cannot determine how to legally use audio, video or images in your education: VIDEMA for film and video; BUMA/STEMRA for music PICTORIGHT for images. 

Find out more about copyright free images, video and audio go to our section find existing video

How to handle copy and image right

Using existing videos in your classroom or lecture hall
  • Showing parts of a video. It’s allowed to show short parts of a video for a non-profit educational purpose, provided that you cite the author.
  • Showing the entire video. Showing an entire video or audio recording is a lecture hall or classroom is allowed under a number of conditions: it is for educational purposes, seen only by students or teachers, is related to the course content or curriculum and is within the physical space of the education institute (i.e lecture hall or classroom). Note that some copyright holders of commercially produced audio-visual materials do require special permission (check documentation or packaging). For instance a Public Video Screening license (PVSL) is a license that can be purchased to cover your school’s staff and students watching. Beware! If guests are invited to a screening then you need to purchase a Single Title Screening Licence (STSL).
Using existing video in your digital learning environment
  • Showing short parts of a video. Short parts of a video may be shared via the digital learning environment (i.e. EleUM or Blackboard). Yes, you are allowed to show short parts of a video for a non-profit educational purpose, provided that you cite the author.
  • Showing the entire video. It is not allowed to show an entire video on the digital learning environment. You need permission from the performers and the third party copyright owners.
  • Providing links to videos. (e.g. YouTube, Vimeo). Yes, linking to videos is permitted, the viewer can watch through streaming without downloading the video. Beware however that the video has been legally put online. Not all videos on YouTube are uploaded with the permission of the copyright holder.
Using existing video in a registered lecture
  • Showing parts of the video. If you show short parts of a video during a lecture that you record and share through the digital learning environment (i.e. EleUM or Blackboard), you may include the parts of vide. It is allowed to show short parts of a video for a non-profit educational purpose, provided that you cite the creator or copyright owner.
  • Showing the entire video. It is not allowed to show a registration of the entire video on the digital learning environment. You need permission from the performers and the third party copyright owners.
  • Providing links to videos. (e.g. YouTube, Vimeo). If you showed a video in your lecture hall by clicking on a link and the lecture is registered (streaming), this video cannot be included in the lecture registration. The action of recording is considered copying or multiplication of the video. You need permission from the performers and the third party copyright owners.

 

Using existing images or video or audio fragments in your video clip
  • Including short parts of a video. Short parts of a video may be shared via the digital learning environment (i.e. EleUM or Blackboard). Yes, you are allowed to show short parts of a video, audio or images in your video for a non-profit and educational purpose, provided that you cite the author.
  • Including the entire video. It is not allowed to include an entire video or film in your video You need permission from the performers and the third party copyright owners.
Rights of the people you film: image rights
  • Image right of students. When registering a lecture or class session, both teacher and students will be visible you need (implicit) permission. A way to get implicit permission is by putting up a paper at the entrance of the door of the lecture hall, indicating the lecture may be registered and requesting students to inform the teacher if they do not wish to be filmed. Their objections need to be reasonable (i.e. invasion of privacy).
  • Image right of patients if you want to use footage of conversations or other forms of interaction with a patient to your students, you need to obtain explicit permission form the patient to use the footage and under what conditions.

Image rights of students performing in a video. People who perform in a video implicitly give you permission to share this with others. It remains highly advisable to ask for explicit and written permission to avoid conflicts about image right and privacy

Creative Commons License

The Creative Commons License (CC license) was specifically designed to make publishing and sharing of copyrighted material easier. Anyone can offer a license for their copyrighted material by placing a web link to the CC-license and CC-icon on their website. The essence of the license is that the maker of a work retains copyright while allowing others to copy, distribute, and make some uses of their work. The icon makes it known what the conditions for the use of material are. There are several search engines and platforms that allow you to search exclusively for material with a creative commons license, go to the find a video section to find examples of such platforms.

Watch the short clip on creative commons licenses or read exactly what each license means, in the list below.

Examples of Creative Commons Licenses

Attributed CC BY

Attribution
CC BY

This license lets others distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon your work, even commercially, as long as they credit you for the original creation. This is the most accommodating of licenses offered. Recommended for maximum dissemination and use of licensed materials.

Attributed-sharealike cc by-sa

Attribution-ShareAlike
CC BY-SA

This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work even for commercial purposes, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms. This license is often compared to “copyleft” free and open source software licenses. All new works based on yours will carry the same license, so any derivatives will also allow commercial use. This is the license used by Wikipedia, and is recommended for materials that would benefit from incorporating content from Wikipedia and similarly licensed projects.

Attributed-noderivs cc by-nd

Attribution-NoDerivs
CC BY-ND

This license allows for redistribution, commercial and non-commercial, as long as it is passed along unchanged and in whole, with credit to you.

Attributed-noncommercial cc by-nc

Attribution-NonCommercial
CC BY-NC

This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work non-commercially, and although their new works must also acknowledge you and be non-commercial, they don’t have to license their derivative works on the same terms.

Attribution-Noncommercial-sharealike cc by-nc-sa

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike
CC BY-NC-SA

This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work non-commercially, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms.

Attribution-Noncommercial-noderivs cc by-nc-nd

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs
CC BY-NC-ND

This license is the most restrictive of our six main licenses, only allowing others to download your works and share them with others as long as they credit you, but they can’t change them in any way or use them commercially.